Saffron Rice

saffron, rice, oil

This easy recipe for saffron rice hails from the south of Thailand, where it is often eaten with roast chicken. Saffron rice makes dinner extra special, and is nearly as easy to make as regular rice.
You needn’t own a rice cooker to make this recipe – it’s boiled in a pot on the stove, but tastes very similar to steamed rice. And unlike most saffron rice recipes, this one is fat-free. Note: Because saffron is so expensive, I only use a little bit, then enhance the color by adding turmeric – a spice which also has incredible health benefits (in Thailand, turmeric is known as ‘poor man’s saffron’).

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Lemon fudge

fudge, soffron

Lemon fudge combines a silky smooth white chocolate fudge with the vibrant taste of tart lemons. This refreshing candy has just the right combination of sweet and sour citrus. This recipe calls citric acid, for which accentuates the tartness of the lemon flavoring. Citric acid can be found in many specialty baking stores and large grocery stores—I found mine in the bulk spices section of a nearby grocery store. It can be omitted if you can’t find it, and your fudge will be a little less tart.

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Swedish Saffron Bread

Swedish Saffron Bread

Traditionally served in Sweden on December 13 to commemorate St. Lucia, Swedish saffron bread is great anytime and makes a fitting accompaniment for breakfast or brunch.

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Shrimp In Persian Saffron

Shrimp in Persian Nikmanesh Saffron

We are all about adding flavor to meals with spices, so we keep it super simple by using only saffron, a spice that comes in thin, red threads. The flavor of saffron is altogether sweet, bitter, and sour. To really get the full aroma and taste of saffron, it needs to be activated by the heat of cooking. In addition to the taste, saffron also imparts a bright, yellow-orange hue to foods.

Each thread of saffron is hand-picked, which makes it the most expensive spice in the world. So this is important to remember: A little goes a long way! All you need are a few threads. Also, it’s best to soak it in a liquid first, or else it will just clump up when you toss it into the dish, making one bite extremely strong and overpowering!

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Indian Bread (Naan)

Indian Bread (Naan)

The earliest appearance of “nan” in English is from 1810, in a travelogue of William Tooke. The Persian word nān ‘bread’ (Uzbek non/нон) is already attested in Middle-Persian/Pahlavi as n’n ‘bread, food’. The form itself is of Iranian origin.

Unlike some other staple Indian breads, which are unleavened and crafted from durum wheat flour, or atta, fluffy naan is made with all-purpose flour and yeast. Traditionally, the dough is slapped against the chimney wall of a clay tandoor oven and baked over wood fires, but many home cooks make it on the stovetop. It is best savored hot and slathered with ghee.

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