Halva

halva

Many countries and regions, including India, Persia, the Balkans, and the Mediterranean, make halva, but historians believe its origins are to be found in the middle East. The name halva derives from the Arabic word “halawe”, meaning “confection”.
the first halva is believed to have been made from dates and milk in the seventh century, but later came to refer to toasted flour mixed with honey or date syrop.

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Pumpkin & Condensed Milk Halwa (Kaddu Halwa)

Pumpkin & Condensed Milk Halwa

an easy and quick Halwa made from only 2 main ingredients Pumpkin Puree and Sweetened Condensed Milk. This sweet tastes more similar to Milk Peda / Palgova as we have used condensed milk. It can be prepared in less than 20 mins and best enjoyed when served cold or at room temp.

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Saffron Rice

saffron, rice, oil

This easy recipe for saffron rice hails from the south of Thailand, where it is often eaten with roast chicken. Saffron rice makes dinner extra special, and is nearly as easy to make as regular rice.
You needn’t own a rice cooker to make this recipe – it’s boiled in a pot on the stove, but tastes very similar to steamed rice. And unlike most saffron rice recipes, this one is fat-free. Note: Because saffron is so expensive, I only use a little bit, then enhance the color by adding turmeric – a spice which also has incredible health benefits (in Thailand, turmeric is known as ‘poor man’s saffron’).

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pros and cons of butter and ghee

ghee vs butter

From a nutritional standpoint, both butter and ghee or organic animal oil are basically made from the fats of whole milk. Although butter in the is almost always made from cow’s milk, the ghee used for cooking in Iran is often made from ship milk. Both ghee and butter are usually 80% milk fat or greater in terms of their composition, and about two-thirds of that fat is saturated fat.

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15 Benefits of Ghee vs Butter

15 Benefits of Ghee vs butter

Modern science now verifies what Ayurvedic health science has said for thousands of years: Ghee has a host of health and cooking benefits and is good for the mind and spirit.

Great For Cooking and Taste:

1. Ghee has a high smoke point (250 °C 482 °F).
You can cook and fry with ghee and it will not break down into free radicals like many other oils.

2. Ghee does not spoil easily so does not need refrigeration.
Some ghee mixtures last up to 100 years.

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Indian Bread (Naan)

Indian Bread (Naan)

The earliest appearance of “nan” in English is from 1810, in a travelogue of William Tooke. The Persian word nān ‘bread’ (Uzbek non/нон) is already attested in Middle-Persian/Pahlavi as n’n ‘bread, food’. The form itself is of Iranian origin.

Unlike some other staple Indian breads, which are unleavened and crafted from durum wheat flour, or atta, fluffy naan is made with all-purpose flour and yeast. Traditionally, the dough is slapped against the chimney wall of a clay tandoor oven and baked over wood fires, but many home cooks make it on the stovetop. It is best savored hot and slathered with ghee.

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Clarified Butter VS Ghee

Clarified Butter VS Ghee

Same technique, but Ghee simmered longer to bring out butter’s inherent nutty flavor!

Clarified butter is made by melting butter and allowing the ingredients to separate by density. The milk solids and water are separated from the butter fat. As the butter melts and simmers the water evaporates, milk solids sink to the bottom and the butter fat (the part you want) and whey protein rises to the top. You can then very carefully skim off the whey protein and pour the butter fat into a jar and store in the fridge for future use.

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